Le Petit Marseillais


The Petit Marseillais was a daily regional newspaper published in Marseille between 1868 and 1944.

History

The newspaper was founded in Marseille in 1868 by Toussaint Samat (1841-1916), a typographer. It was nicknamed the “one-sou newspaper” because of its price (5 cents, or one penny), while other newspapers cost two cents (10 cents). citation needed ] For a long time The Little Marseillais was the only one-sou daily newspaper in the region. [1] In 1880 the Petit Marseillais was the second largest provincial newspaper, behind Le Petit Lyonnais and ahead of La Dépêche . [2] In the 1880s Félix Dubois was one of the newspaper’s European correspondents, writing from Berlin and Vienna. [3]

An 1887 directory of newspapers said The Little Marseillais was Republican, concerned with commerce and finance, with a circulation of 76,000. [4] Competition became stronger with the appearance of the Radical , The Little Provencal and The Sun of the South . In response, The Little Marseillais launched a six-page format on May 16, 1897. [1]

In 1939 The Little Marseillais had a circulation of 150,000. [5] The newspaper covered the south east of France, Corsica and North Africa. It was moderate and continued to call itself “Republican”. [6] Le Petit Marseillais controlled Le Petit Var , based in Toulon , leftist “naval and general information paper” that also supported the July 1940 National Revolution of the Vichy government . [7] The Radical-Socialist The Republic of Var , also based in Toulon, was also controlled by Le Petit Marseillais . [8]

Albert Lejeune was managing editor of Le Petit Marseillais and of Lyon Républicain and Le Petit Niçois during World War II . He was guided by the German authorities, and his newspapers supported collaboration. After France was liberated, Lejeune was tried on 22 October 1944 sentenced to death. [9]

The Republic of Var reappeared after the war. [8] The Little Var was replaced by the communist Le Petit Varois . [7] The Petit Marseillais was replaced by the communist La Marseillaise . [6] Its premises were taken over by La Marseillaise and Midi Soir .

Notes

  1. ^ Jump up to:B Beudot 1999 , p. 150.
  2. Jump up^ Sassoon 2012, p. 150.
  3. Jump up^ Saint-Martin 1986, p. 92.
  4. Jump up^ Sells 1887, p. 532.
  5. Jump up^ Pike 2011, p. 296.
  6. ^ Jump up to:b Evleth 1999 , p. 21.
  7. ^ Jump up to:b Evleth 1999 , p. 179.
  8. ^ Jump up to:b Evleth 1999 , p. 180.
  9. Jump up^ Pike 2011, p. 255.

Sources

  • Beudot, Françoise-Albane (1999). David Dellepiane: Painter, poster artist, illustrator . Parenthesis Editions. p. 150. ISBN  978-2-86364-098-2 . Retrieved 2013-04-28 .
  • Evleth, Donna (1999). The Authorized Press in Vichy and German Occupied France, 1940-1944: A Bibliography . Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN  978-0-313-30784-3 . Retrieved 2013-04-28 .
  • Pike, David Wingeate (2011). France Divided: The French and the Civil War in Spain . Sussex Academic Press. ISBN  978-1-84519-490-1 . Retrieved 2013-04-28 .
  • St. Martin, Yves T. (1986). “Félix Dubois (1862-1945)” (PDF) . Men and destinies . The Academy of Sciences of Overseas. . Retrieved 2013-04-27 .
  • Sassoon, Donald (2012-06-28). The Culture of the Europeans (Text Only Edition) . HarperCollins UK. p. 853. ISBN  978-0-00-740040-9 . Retrieved 2013-04-28 .
  • Sells (1887). Sells’ Dictionary of the World’s Press . Retrieved 2013-04-28 .

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